January 2017

31 Jan

Where does the career in aviation begin?

It is this time of the year when school leavers start thinking intensively which career path to choose for their future. We start considering whether we are happy with our choices or whether we should change the path of the career we are pursuing once all celebrations have been left behind and New Year’s resolutions have already been made. Are there many among us considering a career in aviation? Definitely yes! Therefore, let’s look into the possibilities aviation has to offer. We want to fly! The first profession to cross one’s mind when thinking about the career in aviation usually turns to...

31 Jan

The aviation medical exam: what to expect?

Every candidate must obtain Class I and Class II medical fitness certifications in order to become a commercial pilot. Class II certification is required initially while joining a flying school, while Class I certificate can be obtained during the training. These certifications are issued by local CAA approved medical examiners. The examiners are generally the military and civil medical professionals who check a person’s mental and physical fitness. An applicant for any class of medical assessment shall be required to be free of any abnormality, congenital or acquired; any active, latent, acute or chronic disability; any wound, injury or sequelae from operation;...

24 Jan

Did You Know: the Largest Helicopter in the World

Did you know that the world’s largest helicopter can carry an aircraft, another helicopter or a military truck? The history of this helicopter is very powerful! For example, this helicopter flew over the burning reactor of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and over hot spots around the world in the UN peacekeeping missions. It can carry cargoes with a weight of twenty tons at the distance of 2000 km. Can you guess what we are talking about? It is Mil Mi-26 helicopter! Mi-26 is a Soviet multipurpose transport helicopter. Designed and built by Moscow-based Mil Helicopters, the Mi-26 stands roughly the...

18 Jan

Did You Know That Radar Systems Cannot Detect Turbulence?

Aircraft weather radar systems cannot detect turbulence. It can occur anytime: on a clear cloudless day as well as in severe weather conditions. This is why flight attendants ask you to fasten seat belts as soon as you take your seat. Conventional weather radar cannot detect wind speed or turbulence directly; it only detects solid and liquid objects above a threshold size. Weather radar is merely detecting the presence of water. It is the pilot interpreting the picture, who is really detecting the turbulence. Learn more about turbulence watching the video: Turbulence: what pilots should know? ...

13 Jan

ATPL Integrated Training Program’s Student at BAA Training

A student from Norway tells about pilot training at BAA Training and the life in Lithuania. Would you take the risk and move to another country in order to fulfill your dream? BAA Training headquarters is in Lithuania and counts more than 20 years of experience in aviation training, while its heritage reaches 1938 – the establishment of the Lithuanian airlines training department. In addition to training base in headquters it is able to offer training solutions in various Europe, CIS and Asia locations....

10 Jan

Did You Know Where You Can Fly the Concorde Simulator?

The Concorde was one of the supersonic passenger jet airliners on service between 1976 and 2003. The plane was popular among entrepreneurs because of its ability to fly from London to New York in less than three and a half hours’ time reaching more than twice the speed of sound. More than 2.5 million passengers were flown throughout the period of 27 years. Only 20 aircraft were produced during the time, and only 14 of them were used in the airline industry. Have you ever imagined yourself at the controls of Concorde - the most famous supersonic aircraft in the world?...

4 Jan

Did You Know Why Holding Stacks Is So Important to the Busiest Airports?

Let’s start from the beginning! The definition of holding (or flying a hold) in aviation field means some manoeuvres of aircraft before the landing. Incoming aircraft must sometimes be stacked when an aircraft which has arrived at their destination but cannot land yet because of the traffic congestion, poor weather, or runway unavailability. Stacking means that pilots go into a holding pattern circling radio beacons. Holding stacks work as waiting room for an aircraft before landing. Then the aircraft is in the “waiting room” the air traffic controller efficiently organises the landing directions and runway. For this reason, there can be several...